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A VILLAGE MARKET (Paragraph / Composition / Essay )

Updated: Apr 22

Paragraph Writing



Model Answer-2

Model Answer-3


Composition / Essay Writing


A VILLAGE MARKET

 A village market is a market where the village people buy and sell things of their day-to-day use. It is a place of great noise and bustle during market hours.

There are two kinds of village market – the daily market and the periodic market. The daily market is held in the forenoon and the periodic market is held once or twice a week in the afternoon. Crowds of people gather in the market for making sales and purchases.

A village market is generally held in an open place by the side of a river or a canal or a road. It is divided broadly into three parts – open space, temporary shades and permanent shades. In the open space, shops of the same kind sit together. Here milk, fruit, betels, vegetables, fish, etc. are sold.

In the temporary sheds there sit the grocers who deal in oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper, copy books etc. These sheds are made in rows with sufficient space in between two rows for the buyers to move freely. The area where the fishermen sit for the sale of fish is the most crowded part in the market.

The remaining part of the market consists of permanent shops or stalls, also arranged in rows. Here the shopkeepers sell rice, wheat, pulse, flour, sugar, fried rice, gur, ghee, spices, cloth and other useful things.    This part of the market is less crowded, because the things sold there are not usually of daily need. Fish, milk, vegetables, rice, pulse, eggs, poultry are generally cheaper in a village market because these are available in villages. Clothes, shoes, suit-cases and other fancy goods are dearer, because they are here from towns paying charges of conveyance.

 The village market is not free from its drawbacks. There is no fixed price of articles here. Another defects is its unclean condition. There are no public sweepers to sweep away rubbish and filth from the market.

 In spite of all these, the village market does great service to the rural people. It saves them from the trouble and expenses of going to distant place to buy things of daily use. It is the meeting place of the village people and they also get news and views from here.

 

 

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A VILLAGE MARKET

 

       A village market is a hub of activity where the local villagers gather to purchase and sell their daily essentials. This bustling marketplace is classified into two types, the daily and the periodic market. The former is conducted in the morning, whereas the latter is held once or twice a week in the afternoon. It is an event where people come together for commercial transactions and social interactions.

 

Typically, a village market is located in an open space by the side of a river, canal, or road. This space is divided into three distinct parts: the open space, temporary shades, and permanent shades. The open space is where vendors sell items such as milk, fruit, betel, vegetables, and fish. Meanwhile, the temporary shades are used by grocers who sell oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper, and copybooks. These temporary sheds are organized in rows, providing ample space for buyers to move around.

 

The fishermen's section is the most crowded part of the market, where they sell their fresh catch of fish. The remaining part of the market is comprised of permanent shops or stalls, arranged in rows, where shopkeepers sell rice, wheat, pulses, flour, sugar, ghee, spices, cloth, and other useful items. This section of the market is less congested, as the goods sold here are not typically needed on a daily basis.

 

The village market offers reasonable prices for fish, milk, vegetables, rice, pulses, eggs, and poultry since these items are readily available in the villages. However, clothing, shoes, suitcases, and other fancy goods are pricier due to their transportation costs from the towns.

 

Despite its advantages, the village market has some drawbacks. The absence of fixed pricing for goods and unhygienic conditions are two of the market's shortcomings. Regrettably, there are no public sweepers to clean the marketplace of rubbish and filth.

 

Notwithstanding these issues, the village market provides an invaluable service to rural communities by saving them the hassle and expenses of traveling to distant locations to purchase everyday essentials. Furthermore, the market serves as a meeting point for village inhabitants, who come together to exchange news and views while conducting business transactions.


A VILLAGE MARKET 

 A village market is a market where the village people buy and sell things of their day-to-day use. It is a place of great noise and bustle during market hours.

There are two kinds of village market – the daily market and the periodic market. The daily market is held in the forenoon and the periodic market is held once or twice a week in the afternoon. Crowds of people gather in the market for making sales and purchases.

A village market is generally held in an open place by the side of a river or a canal or a road. It is divided broadly into three parts – open space, temporary shades and permanent shades. In the open space, shops of the same kind sit together. Here milk, fruit, betels, vegetables, fish, etc. are sold.

In the temporary sheds there sit the grocers who deal in oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper, copy books etc. These sheds are made in rows with sufficient space in between two rows for the buyers to move freely. The area where the fishermen sit for the sale of fish is the most crowdie part in the market.

The remaining part of the market consists of permanent shops or stalls, also arranged in rows. Here the shopkeepers sell rice, wheat, pulse, flour, sugar, fried rice, gur, ghee, spices, cloth and other useful things.    This part of the market is less crowded, because the things sold there are not usually of daily need. Fish, milk, vegetables, rice, pulse, eggs, poultry are generally cheaper in a village market because these are available in villages. Clothes, shoes, suit-cases and other fancy goods are dearer, because they are here from towns paying charges of conveyance.

 The village market is not free from its drawbacks. There is no fixed price of articles here. Another defects is its unclean condition. There are no public sweepers to sweep away rubbish and filth from the market.

 In spite of all these, the village market does great service to the rural people. It saves them from the trouble and expenses of going to distant place to buy things of daily use. It is the meeting place of the village people and they also get news and views from here.

Advanced

                                                 A VILLAGE MARKET 

 

A village market serves as a bustling hub of commerce where denizens of rural communities trade goods necessary for their daily lives. This bustling scene is characterized by a cacophony of sounds and a lively energy during market hours. There are two primary categories of village markets: the daily market, which occurs in the morning, and the periodic market, which takes place once or twice a week in the afternoon. Crowds gather eagerly, eager to engage in the purchase and sale of wares.

Typically situated in an open space adjacent to a river, canal, or road, a village market is divided into three distinct sections: the open space, the temporary shades, and the permanent stalls. In the open space, vendors of similar goods cluster together, selling milk, fruit, vegetables, betel leaves, and fish. The temporary sheds host grocers who offer oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pens, ink, paper, and copy books, arranged in tidy rows to afford ample space for buyers to move about with ease. The area where fishermen sell their fish is the most congested area of the market.

The remaining portion of the market is comprised of permanent shops or stalls arranged in neat rows. Here, merchants sell rice, wheat, pulses, flour, sugar, fried rice, gur, ghee, spices, cloth, and other practical items. This sector of the market is less busy as the items sold there are not typically needed on a daily basis. In a village market, fish, milk, vegetables, rice, pulses, eggs, and poultry are often less expensive due to their availability in the surrounding areas. Conversely, clothes, shoes, suitcases, and other luxury items are pricier, as they must be transported from more urban areas.

Although the village market is an invaluable resource for rural communities, it is not without its flaws. One major issue is the lack of fixed prices for goods. Another disadvantage is the unclean environment. There are no public sweepers to manage the removal of refuse and filth from the market.

In spite of these challenges, the village market remains a vital source of support for rural communities, alleviating the trouble and expense of traveling to distant locales to procure essential goods. Additionally, the market serves as a meeting place where villagers can connect and share news and opinions, further cementing the market's importance in the fabric of rural life.



A VILLAGE MARKET

A village market is a market where the village people buy and sell things of their day-to-day use. It is a place of great noise and bustle during market hours.

 

There are two kinds of village market – the daily market and the periodic market. The daily market is held in the forenoon and the periodic market is held once or twice a week in the afternoon. Crowds of people gather in the market for making sales and purchases.

 

A village market is generally held in an open place by the side of a river or a canal or a road. It is divided broadly into three parts – open space, temporary shades and permanent shades. In the open space, shops of the same kind sit together. Here milk, fruit, betels, vegetables, fish, etc. are sold.

In the temporary sheds there sit the grocers who deal in oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper, copy books etc. These sheds are made in rows with sufficient space in between two rows for the buyers to move freely. The area where the fishermen sit for the sale of fish is the most crowded part in the market.

 

The remaining part of the market consists of permanent shops or stalls, also arranged in rows. Here the shopkeepers sell rice, wheat, pulse, flour, sugar, fried rice, gur, ghee, spices, cloth and other useful things.        This part of the market is lesscrowded, because the things sold there are not usually of daily need. Fish, milk, vegetables, rice, pulse, eggs, poultry are generally cheaper in a village market because these are available in villages. Clothes, shoes, suitcases and other fancy goods are dearer, because they are here from towns paying charges of conveyance.

The village market is not free from its drawbacks. There is no fixed price of articles here. Another defect is its unclean condition. There are no public sweepers to sweep away rubbish and filth from the market.

 

In spite of all these, the village market does great service to the rural people. It saves them from the trouble and expenses of going to a distant place to buy things of daily use. It is the meeting place of the village people and they also get news and views from here.

 

 

A VILLAGE MARKET

A village market is a market where the village people buy and sell things of their day-to-day use. It is a place of great noise and bustle during market hours.

 

There are two kinds of village market – the daily market and the periodic market. The daily market is held in the forenoon and the periodic market is held once or twice a week in the afternoon. Crowds of people gather in the market for making sales and purchases.

A village market is generally held in an open place by the side of a river or a canal or a road. It is divided broadly into three parts – open space, temporary shades and permanent shades. In the open space, shops of the same kind sit together. Here milk, fruit, betels, vegetables, fish, etc. are sold.

 

In the temporary sheds there sit the grocers who deal in oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper, copy books etc. These sheds are made in rows with sufficient space in between two rows for the buyers to move freely. The area where the fishermen sit for the sale of fish is the most crowded part in the market.

 

The remaining part of the market consists of permanent shops or stalls, also arranged in rows. Here the shopkeepers sell rice, wheat, pulse, flour, sugar, fried rice,gur, ghee, spices, cloth and other useful things. This part of the market is lesscrowded, because the things sold there are not usually of daily need. Fish, milk,

vegetables, rice, pulse, eggs, poultry are generally cheaper in a village market because these are available in villages. Clothes, shoes, suitcases and other fancy goods are dearer, because they are here from towns paying charges of conveyance.

 

The village market is not free from its drawbacks. There is no fixed price of articles here. Another defect is its unclean condition. There are no public sweepers to sweep away rubbish and filth from the market.

 

In spite of all these, the village market does great service to the rural people. It saves them from the trouble and expenses of going to a distant place to buy things of daily use. It is the meeting place of the village people and they also get news and views from here.

 

 

 

A VILLAGE MARKET

Bangladesh is a country of villages. A village market is the heart of the villages. It throbs with the activities of the village. Every village in Bangladesh has got a bazar or market where the village people meet to buy and sell their daily necessaries. It is a place of hustle and bustle during market hours.

A village market is generally held in an open place by the side of either a river or a canal. It is so situated for the convenience of transport and communication with other villages. A number of roads connect it with the neighbouring villages.

The village market is divided broadly into three parts ---- open space, temporary sheds and permanent sheds. In the open space, shops of the same kind cluster together. Here milk, fruit, betels, vegetables, fish etc are sold. The stalls for fish, betel and vegetables of various kinds are spread in order. In the temporary sheds, sit the grocers who deal in oil, salt, cloves, pepper, pen, ink, paper and copy-books etc. These sheds are erected in rows so that the buyers may move freely. The other part of the market consists of permanent shops or stalls, arranged in rows. Here the shop-keepers sell rice, wheat, pulse, flour, sugar, ghee, spices, cloth and other useful things.

 

With the permanent shopkeepers or stall-keepers, the price is more or less fixed. The crowd in the open space is the densest, for here our daily necessaries are sold. Therewhere the fishermen sit for the sale of fish is the most crowded part in the market. But the area of the permanent shops or stalls is comparatively less frequented. Fish, milk, vegetables and fruits are the articles of trade in the daily gathering.

The things come from the adjoining villages. Some of the villagers come here to buy, some come here to sell and some come here to do both. There are some people who come here neither to sell nor to buy. The children also take share of joy as holiday to buy something from the market. The fish market is the greatest attraction of the villages. Other things which attract them most are the canvassers who sell medicine etc by marking eloquent speeches or beating drums.

A village market is the ready market of the agricultural goods and village products and builds the economy of the village. It is very useful to the villagers. Thousands and thousands of men come from all the villages round the market and make it a scene of great activity and brisk business. Here they can buy things that are necessary in their day-today life. It provides them an opportunity to sell the things they produce. It fulfils the basic needs of the people including employment. It boosts up economic activities of the people and makes then financially viable. It also serves as a meeting place for friends and relatives.

The village market is not free from its drawbacks. There is no fixed price of articles here. Higgling is the most prominent here. Another disadvantage of a village market is its unclean condition. It is dusty in the dry season and muddy in the rainy season.

A village market is the integral part of the rural life. It renders a great service to the rural people. It is a very important part in the economic life of the villagers. The government or the local authorities plan to make a village market an ideal place for trade and commerce.   

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