top of page

How to write better English

                                       Writing assessment criteria

 

Your Writing is basically assessed based on four criteria:

  • Task Achievement (TA) = how well you answer the question. ...

  • Coherence and Cohesion (CC) = how well is your text structured. ...

  • Lexical Resource (LR) = how good is your vocabulary. ...

  • Grammatical Range and Accuracy (GRA) = how good is your grammar.

Task Response

In this criterion, the type of response that you write for the essay type question is determined. It assesses the main idea of your essay and the way you develop it with relative examples.

To score better:

  • pay attention to ALL issues in the essay question

  • write about the issues rather than just the general topic

  • answer the essay question with relevant main points

  • plan your supporting points so they don’t go off the topic

  • write required number of words

 

Coherence & Cohesion

 

This writing criterion determines the proper use of linking words, paragraphing skills and use of cohesive devices (for example, connectors, conjunctions) is determined.

Also, the number of paragraphs is taken into consideration. Dividing your essay into more or fewer paragraphs might lower your score.

To score better:

  • have either four or five paragraphs but not more and not less

  • this means you should have two or three body paragraphs only

  • have just one central topic in each body paragraph

  • organise your ideas logically

  • use a range of linking words

  • avoid errors in linking words

 

 

Lexical Resource

Under this criterion, the use of a sufficient range of vocabulary, proper spellings, correct implementation of collocations, and word formation are taken care of while scoring. You must avoid using wrong words and informal language.

To score better:

  • pay attention to collocations

  • paraphrase carefully to avoid errors

  • use a range of words appropriate for the topic

  • spell words correctly

  • avoid making errors

  • avoid using informal language

 

Grammatical Range & Accuracy

 

To score this criterion, things taken into consideration include sentence structures, proper use of tenses, putting right punctuations, use of simple as well as complex statements with clear ideas, and control over Grammar.

To score better:

  • use a wide range of grammatical structures

  • pay attention to word order in your sentences

  • use a range of sentence structures

  • use the correct punctuation

  • avoid errors in grammar

                 Key tools to Bring Variety to Your Writing

 

 

 

  1. Pre-test on writing tools

  2. Pre-test on Writing Tools Answers

  3. Opening Adjective

  4. Delayed Adjective

  5. Opening Adverb

  6. Delayed Adverb

  7. Absolute Phrase

  8. Appositive Phrase

  9. Prepositional Phrase

  10. Participial Phrase

  11. Gerund Phrase

  12. Infinitive Phrase

  13. Clause Types (Independent, Dependent)

  14. Noun Clause

  15. Adjective Clause

  16. Adverb Clause

  17. Subject-Verb Split Mix

  18. Opener Mix

  19. Closer Mix

  20. Examples of Single tools

  21. Examples Multiplying the Tools

  22. Other Mix

  23. Comma

  24. Semicolon

  25. Colon

  26. Dash

  27. Review: Colon, Semicolon, Dash

  28. Conjunctions to start sentences

  29. Inversion

  30. Relatives

  31. Conditionals

  32. Parallel structure

  33. The Passive

  34. Impersonal Structure

  35. Using Models

  36. Some points to bring variety in sentence

  • Simple with complex grammar

  • Different sentence length combining

  • Larger and shorter sentences

  • Cleft Sentences

Find out which writing tools (above mentioned) are used in the following sentences:

                             

 1.    Fudge, a portly little man in a long, pinstriped cloak, looked cold and exhausted.
2.    At daybreak on a fine summer’s morning, when the Riddle House had still been well kept and impressive, a maid had entered the drawing room to find all three Riddles dead.
3.    The first thing they saw was Peeves the Poltergeist, who was floating upside down in mid air and stuffing the nearest keyhole with chewing gum.
4.    Hating himself, repulsed by what he was doing, Harry forced the goblet back toward Dumbledore’s mouth and tipped it for Dumbledore to drink the remainder of the horrible potion inside.
5.    To make Dudley feel better about eating “rabbit food,” Aunt Petunia had insisted that the whole family follow the same diet, too.
6.    Slowly, very slowly, the snake raised its head until its eyes were on a level with Harry’s.
7.    He raised the wand above his head and brought it swishing down through the dusty air as a stream of red and gold sparks shot from the end like a firework, throwing dancing spots of light onto the walls.
8.    Harry knew that Dumbledore was going to refuse, that he would tell Riddle there would be plenty of time for practical demonstrations at Hogwarts, and that they were currently in a building full of Muggles and must therefore be cautious.
9.    The gigantic snake was nearing Frank, and then, incredibly, miraculously, it passed him, following the spitting, hissing noises made by the cold voice beyond the door.
10.    Furious, Harry threw his ingredients and his bag into his cauldron and dragged it up to the front of the dungeon to the empty table.
11.    Soon, the crowd of gnomes in the field started walking away in a staggering line,
their little shoulders hunched.
12.    He raised the wand above his head and brought it swishing down through the dusty air as a stream of red and gold sparks shot from the end like a firework, throwing dancing spots of light onto the  walls.
13.    Conjuring up portable, waterproof fires was a specialty of   Hermione’s.
14.    Harry was on his feet again, furious, ready to fly at Dumbledore, who had plainly not understood Sirius at all.
15.    Soon, the crowd of gnomes in the field started walking away in a staggering line, their little shoulders hunched. 
16.    Soon, the crowd of gnomes in the field started walking away in a staggering line, their little shoulders hunched, their steps unsteady from too many sips of elderberry wine. 
17.    Soon, the crowd of gnomes in the field started walking away in a stag- gering line, their little shoulders hunched. 
18.    Soon, after the revelry to celebrate the coming of the solstice and its magical light ended, the crowd of gnomes in the field started walking away in a staggering line, their little shoulders hunched. 

 

 

 

 Writing Tools Answers

 

  1. appositive  phrase 

  2. prepositional  phrase 

  3. adjective clause

  4. participial  phrase 

  5. infinitive phrase

  6. opening adverb

  7. adverb clause 

  8. noun clause

  9. delayed adverb

  10. opening adjective

  11. absolute phrase

  12. independent clause

  13. gerund phrase

  14. delayed adjective 

  15. one absolute    phrase

  16. multiple absolute phrases

  17.  one absolute phrase, closer position

  18. one absolute phrase, closer position, plus an added adverb clause, opener position.

                        Some Samples of Writing Transformation

Question

These days, it seems that an increasing number of people are leaving rural areas to live in the city.

Discuss some of the effects of rural depopulation (migration from the country to the city ) and suggest some ways on which this trend could be reversed.

Model answer for achieving  around 50%  marks

Rural depopulation is a very important issue in many parts of the world today. In this essay, I will discuss some of the main effects of this problem and also offer some possible solutions to it.

Firstly, it is clear that migration away from the country negatively affects life in the city. Serious environmental and social problems often occur when cities become overcrowded. Problems such as air, water and noise pollution are increasing common in urban areas around the world because there are simply too many people living there.

Pollution can make city life very uncomfortable indeed and can even cause illness. Beijing is a very good example of this. Overcrowding in cities can also lead high unemployment (especially in poorer parts of the world) and crime.

In order to prevent people from moving away from the country and reduce the size of cities, I feel we make country life more attractive. In my view, the best way of doing this would be to improve services in the country. One of the main reasons that so many people have left the country is that facilities like shopping centres, cinemas, swimming pools, restaurants, libraries, schools and hospitals are generally batter in the city. If such facilities were available in the country, more people would choose to live there. Another effective solution would be for the government to subsidies businesses and workers who move the country.

In conclusion, I believe we must all recognise how serious this problem is. For the sake of the environment and our own quality of life it is vital that we preserve rural communities.

Model answer for achieving 80%  marks

While country towns were once vibrant and growing places, these days many appear to be dying as people move to the city in search of work and excitement. In this essay, I intend to discuss the impact of this problem as well as how more people could be encouraged to live in the rural areas.

Surprisingly, the most serious consequences of rural depopulation are often felt in urban areas. As a result of overcrowding, cities throughout the word today are increasing prone to

environment problems like air, water and noise pollution. Beijing is a particularly good example of this. Further, the uncontrolled growth of cities also gives rise to social problems such as high unemployment, crime and in less affluent countries, the creation of slums. Clearly, there is a limit to how many people can live in one area before living standards are negatively influenced.

In order to stem the tide of rural depopulation, I believe we must first address its root causes. At the heart of the matter is the disparity between services and facilities in the country and those in the city. I firmly believe that urban and rural dwellers alike would find the idea of country life far more appealing if high quality shopping centres, cinemas, swimming pools, restaurants, libraries, schools and hospitals were more readily available in the country. One further method of attracting people to the country would be for government to provide financial incentives to business and professional workers who willingly relocate to rural areas.

In reality, this problem is unlikely to be resolved in the short term. However, it is by no means insurmountable, and I am convinced that more people will choose the country as city life becomes less comfortable and more expensive.

                                                                   

Story Writing

                                                                 

                                                                  The Mouse and the New Cat

Basic English

A mouse lives under the floorboards of an old house. A family moves in. The Mouse is upset to find the family owns a Cat. The Mouse considers moving to a new place. As he does so, the Cat starts speaking to him.

The Cat tells the Mouse that he has no interest in him. He says that his owners feed him very well. Catching the Mouse is too much trouble. If the Mouse stays out of trouble, there will be no problems.

The Mouse replies very politely. But because he is cautious, the Mouse sneaks under the floorboards and spies on the Cat. He sees the Cat sharpening his claws. The Cat has a deadly look in his eyes. When the Mouse sees this, he packs up his things to leave.

The Mouse tells himself that the Cat may say anything, but this sight says a whole lot more.

 

Intermediate English

 

                                                                    The Mouse and the New Cat

There was a mouse who lived under the floorboards of an old house. When a family moved in, the mouse was concerned to learn they owned a Cat. He was considering moving to a new place, when the Cat appeared near his mousehole and started speaking to him.

The Cat told the Mouse that he had no interest in trying to catch him. His owners fed him well enough, and he was too old to be chasing a mouse around. If the Mouse would just stay out of trouble, the Cat explained, they would have no problems.

The Mouse politely thanked the Cat for his kind words. But because he was cautious, the Mouse snuck under the floorboards in the kitchen to spy on the Cat a little. While he was there, he saw the Cat sharpening his claws with a deadly look in his eyes. As soon as he saw this, the Mouse started packing his things.

The Cat might say anything, the Mouse told himself, but what he just saw said a whole lot more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced English

                                                                         The Mouse and the New Cat

 

There once was a Mouse living under the floorboards of an old house. A family moved in, and the Mouse was chagrined to discover they had a Cat with them. The Mouse was mulling over the idea of moving to a new place when the Cat poked his head near the mousehole and started speaking to him.

“I can smell you in there, little mouse,” the Cat told him, “and let me assure you I have no interest in you at all. I’m getting on in years, and my owners feed me so well that catching you would be more trouble than you’re worth. Just keep yourself out of the way down there and we’ll get along famously.”

“Very well,” the Mouse replied courteously. But the Mouse was a cautious fellow, and he snuck under one of the floorboards in the kitchen where he could spy on the Cat through a little hole that he had made. Sure enough, he found the Cat carefully sharpening his claws with a murderous glint in his eyes. As soon as the Mouse saw this, he started packing his things to leave. “Let him say what he will,” the Mouse said to himself, “but what I just saw said a whole lot more!”

 

Moral:

Actions speak louder than words.

                                    The Two Hunters

Basic English

Two hunters are out looking for quail one day. One of them finds one and chases after it. It flies into a thick bush near a pond. He finds a second quail, but it also flies into the bush. He sits by the bush and waits. Sooner or later the birds have to leave their hiding place.

An hour later, his friend comes by and finds him waiting there. The friend has a caught bird and shows it to him. The first hunter says he has two birds. He points to the bush and explains he will get the birds when they try to fly out.

The friend offers to take a look in the bush. When they do, they do not find any birds. Instead, there is only a space where the two birds used to be.

Intermediate English

Two hunters were out looking for quail one day. The first hunter found one and chased after it, but it flew into a thick bush by a pond. Then he found

 

a second quail, but it also flew into the bush. He sat by the bush and waited for a while. He thought to himself that sooner or later the birds would leave their hiding place and he could catch them.

An hour or so later, the hunter’s friend came by and found him waiting. The friend showed the quail he’d caught and asked how the first hunter was doing. The first hunter said he’d caught two birds. He pointed to the bush and explained how he would catch them when they tried to fly out.

The friend suggested they take a look inside to see whether the two birds were still in the bush. But when they did, they found no birds. They only found the place where the birds had hopped through the bush and flown off.

 

Advanced English

Two hunters were out trying to bag quail one day. The first hunter found one and chased after it, only to have it fly into a thick bush by a pond. Soon afterward he found a second quail, but it too fled into the bush. He sat by the bush for a while thinking that sooner or later the birds would have to leave, and he’d get them when they did.

An hour or so later, the hunter’s friend came by and found him still waiting there for the birds. “I’ve bagged a good one,” the friend said, holding up a plump quail he’d caught, “How about you?” “I’ve got two,” the first hunter said. “Where?” his friend asked, looking around. “Right over there in that bush. I drove them in there a couple hours ago, and it’s just a matter of time before I get them both when they try to get away.”

“Oh, you think you’ve got them both, do you?” the friend taunted him. “Let’s take a look.” When they checked the bush, however, they found nothing but a little space in the back where the two quails had long since hopped through the bush and flown away.

 

Moral:

A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.

© Copyright
© Copyright©©
© Copyright
bottom of page